Monday, November 9, 2015

Asshats

DH and I have been taking the kids hiking the past few weeks - there are some fantastic trails in our town and I've been itching to get out there and check them out. These trails are seriously some hidden gems that most of the townfolk don't seem to know about. We started hiking one set of trails in particular that are fast becoming a part of my top ten fave places to be. When walking them, it's kind of easy to feel like we're all lost in the wilderness, exploring the great outdoors, far away from the daily grind. And there are so many different paths to take - we've been doing this most evenings for the past two months, once the littles get out of school and we haven't hiked all the trails yet.

But, the point of this post is unfortunately not to discuss the merits of these family adventures - instead, I want to talk about an incident that occurred today just as we were finishing up our hike. I want to preface this story by first saying that what happened this evening won't deter us from hiking in the future, nor will it spoil the rest of my night. But since I'm still ruminating on it and I want to let it go and move on, I'm going to spill it here.

As we were finishing up our hike tonight, we came out from the trails by the clearing that leads back to the parking lot and we could see a huge Doberman Pinscher loping towards us. It was not leashed, and I recognized him, and his owners, from a hike we went on just a few days ago. This is the second time I saw him without a leash. For the record, I consider myself a dog person and I do like dogs. I am not, in general, afraid of them. But some dogs, especially large ones, can be very intimidating - even to adults who like dogs. This one intimidated me, and since we just had an incident with another large, unleashed dog a couple of days ago (on the same hiking trails) that involved DS, I was a little more sensitive to this than I might have been in the past. Though I was fairly certain this Doberman tonight meant us no harm and just wanted to check us out, I was very uncomfortable with the idea that he was coming closer. And he came awfully close.

And when DH and I expressed our feelings of discomfort, the couple - a man and a woman, (maybe in their sixties, though I didn't get a close look because I was too busy making sure my littles were all safe and accounted for during this exchange) immediately got defensive. The woman said, "He's okay. No, no, he's okay," when she heard DH attempting to herd the children closer to us and prevent them from bounding out into the open field until the dog was gone. (Like me, DH was thinking that the dog might chase the kids if they started running - obviously unacceptable even if the dog wasn't vicious). When I heard her say that in response to DH's concern that her dog might possibly be a safety issue for our children, I called out, "That dog needs to be on a leash." The lady repeated herself, "No! No! He's okay. It's okay, he's okay."

No. Not okay. It's not okay that this cunt's response to our concern for the safety of our children (because of HER pet) was to completely disregard it. It's not okay that she felt the leash laws in our state and our town that protect my family's right to demand that her dog be on a leash did not apply to her. It's not okay that she thinks it's acceptable to allow her very large and intimidating breed of dog to roam free where it could, however briefly, come in contact with other individuals who are not comfortable with that. It's not okay that she didn't take into consideration that some individuals are allergic to dogs and any form of contact with them could potentially be dangerous. It's not okay that, rather than invoke empathy towards myself and my children, she became almost instantly defensive, and it's not okay that she failed to ever take responsibility and acknowledge that her shitty choices effect other people. It's also not okay that she failed to accede to the many various reasons why leash laws are upheld in our state and our town - a few of which pertain to the safety and well-being of her own damn dog. It's not okay that they never once attempted to call the dog back to them or prevent him from approaching us. I said again, louder this time, "No. It's not okay. He needs to be on a leash."

All of this was being spoken loudly because DH and I were still, I don't know maybe forty feet away from the couple. The dog, at this point, was already closer to us than to his owners. After my second declaration that the dog needed to be on a leash, the man became very condescending and the woman pretty much just lost her shit. The man said something to the effect of, "As long as we have control of the dog, he doesn't have to be on a leash," to which I replied, "No, there are leash laws and all dogs in a public place need to be on a leash."

To that the woman said, "Well, I'm not leashing him." At this point, we all kind of started to converge on one another, as the couple with the dog were heading to their car, DH and the littles were passing them on their way to the field, and I was nearing our car, which was parked right next to theirs. The man said something that I couldn't hear and then followed up with this, directed at me: "Let me explain something to you, Honey," which immediately pissed me off. I replied, "Don't call me Honey" with the same kind of disgust I might have had if I'd stepped in some of his dog's poop. (DH told me afterwards that he responded to that comment, "Don't do that" and the woman's response was something like, "Oh no no, it was innocent, it was innocent" which I think was meant as a way to excuse her husband's comment towards me).

His wife didn't like my response, I guess, because after that she started dropping all kinds of F-Bombs and pretty vicious verbal attacks. She obviously wanted to get the last word in and it didn't seem to matter what I said, because she just kept at it, even though she was obviously preparing to leave. As she was walking to her car, she told me to "Shut the fuck up" and that she was "glad I wasn't her daughter." After the first, DH, sort of stunned, asked me what she had said and I told him she dropped the f-bomb on me. DH said, loudly, so the woman would hear, "Really? In front of the children? You have some nerve, lady."

When she told me she was glad I wasn't her daughter, I confirmed that the feeling was mutual. At least we had that in common. But other than our shared relief over not being biologically related to each other, I can't say we would have had much else to discuss that would have resulted in a pleasant outcome.

It was obvious that she has a seriously debilitating sense of entitlement and a total disregard for at least some societal and interpersonal boundaries. The last thing I remember the man saying was that he would "leave us alone" which I took to mean he actually wanted to back off and move on, even if his condescending tone was still present. If so, his efforts failed because his disgusting wife was totally running THAT show. She F-bombed her way to the car and into the car. Even as she closed her door, leaving her husband to round up the dog, she kept running her mouth - all of it directed at me. When I commented sarcastically to her husband, who had to call his dog to the car several times, that he "really had his dog under control," the woman said, "That's because he smells some shit."

In a matter of, what, three minutes, this woman f-bombed me several times, attempted to insult me on a very personal level, and essentially called me a piece of shit - all in front of my very young children, and all because I demanded that her dog be on a leash and her husband not speak to me in a condescending manner.

So now I'll tell it like it is: The shit that dog was smelling came from it's owners, not me. Anyone who thinks that their dog has more right to roam free than I and my family have to be and feel safe from that dog in a public space, is fucked in the head. Similarly, anyone who believes that they can break the rules because they claim ignorance to any given law, or who believes that they can break a given law because they are above it and it doesn't apply to them, is fucked in the head. Furthermore, anyone who can knowingly disregard laws that have been put in place so that situations such as the one illustrated above can be prevented, and then who dare to respond to their challengers in a way that is completely disproportional and irrational to the situation, are, you guessed it: fucked. in. the. head.

It would be remiss of me to say that this woman was crazy because, in spite of her completely irrational response to my declaration that her dog needed to be leashed, I don't actually think she was. When I say, "fucked in the head" I mean it in the most sane way possible. I think this woman was entirely sane. She's just a big dick. A big dick with a big dog.

I feel bad for the dog. No one should be forced into the company of people like them.

My kids asked questions about the situation, both during and after. It was difficult to answer their questions during the nonsense going on, but DH and I tried our best. DS asked me what the "ex-bomb" was, which I explained was a very nasty word. And while the dumbasses were still getting into their car and within clear sight and hearing-range, DD asked why "those people" were "being nasty and saying bad things." I told them, making sure to project my voice, that "unfortunately, some people are just very rude and nasty."

Then, DH took the kids to the field and I flipped the bird at the assholes as they backed out of their parking space. In hindsight, I REALLY wish I had turned and smiled at them as they drove off, as I think that would have irked them more than my one-fingered-solute likely did. I'm still working on that as a viable response to general asshole-ishness from people though - because I do think it's so much more effective as a defense technique. I have observed that assholes like that hate being laughed at. They hate it when their nastiness doesn't hurt the people they're aiming it at - so what better than to laugh in their faces while they are busy trying to pawn off their misery on the rest of the world?

The end.

25 comments:

  1. This is a big pet peeve of mine. Almost everyone who's been bitten by a loose dog has had the owner say, "S/he's never done that before!"

    As a runner, this is a concern for me because dogs get excited when they see someone running. I'm not afraid of dogs in general either, but one comes running after me, barking and growling? I'm supposed to be reassured that the animal is "fine"? I've been walking other people's dogs on a leash when other, loose dogs have come barreling at us. One of the times the small dog I was walking was viciously attacked by another dog. It's not ok.

    If you see those folks on the trail again with their loose dog, you should take note of their license plates and call animal control.

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    1. In the heat of the moment, it hadn't occurred to me to get their license plate number, which would have been the easiest thing. I'm totally kicking myself now. I could have just snapped a picture of their plates with my cell phone, which I had in my pocket.

      The whole situation just isn't acceptable. And you're right, how many times do we hear dog owners say, "But he's friendly, he's never bitten anyone before!" There are leash laws for a whole lot of really good reasons. Plus, with these large-breed dogs, they are pretty much face-to-face with my five and six year old (or a kid in a stroller) - if that dog attacks them, he's attacking their face! Not okay.

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  2. I have an 18 month old German Shepherd who is MY baby. I put the emphasis on My because he's mine and I see no need to share him with or impose him on anyone else. I recognize and respect that that I have chosen a breed that makes many people uncomfortable, which I'll admit is why I take him to the door with me when the doorbell rings!
    Point I'm making is, just because he's perfectly trained, and has walked off leash since he was three months old doesn't give me the right to unleash him anywhere but on my own property. Shepherds are valued as family pets because, properly trained they are stable, predictable and excellent with children. Having said that, while he was leashed, I had a pre-schooler charge at him with a big stick and he barked which scared the kid. My dog's only move was to back up against me because HE was scared. The mother helped the whole situation by screaming at me! No f-bombs were exchanged but I told the mother the protocol for approaching a strange dog was to ask the owner's permission.
    Having owned 15 dogs in my life, mostly large males, I will say that NO dog regardless of breed or training is 100% safe around young children, especially those beyond the dog's immediately family.
    BTW it's my experience that Doberman's are neither stable nor predictable! Unlike Shepherds they're not bred as protectors, they're bred as attackers.
    Long winded way to say, I agreed with you wholeheartedly and wish you'd gotten a license plate # and called it in.

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    1. We are teaching the kids proper dog-approaching etiquette, just as I learned as a child: You never, ever approach someone else's dog without asking permission from the owner/handler first. And then, if you've been given the go-ahead, you approach them gently and offer them a hand to sniff so that THEY can acclimate to you first.

      My Aunt took me and my brothers to dog shows when we were little and those were always her rules, and they were excellent rules. Sometimes the owners told us we couldn't pet their dogs, for various reasons: sometimes it was because the dogs weren't friendly or weren't friendly to children, and sometimes it was because the dogs were about to be shown and the owner's didn't want them riled up or their coats mussed. And even as children, we understood that the owners had a right to say no to our request to pet their dogs and we respected that, said thank you, and moved on.

      There is etiquette that has to be followed and for good reason. I don't want anyone hurt, scared, or uncomfortable - children or dogs! What it comes down to, always, is people being ignorant, selfish, and rude. It's like, listen lady, I'll train my kids to respect your dog, and you keep your dog leashed when out in public to insure the safety and well-being of other people and other people's pets.

      I REALLY wish I had gotten her plates. Damn. Maybe I'll get another chance.

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  3. I routinely say no what people as me if their young children can approach my Shepherd because I find the KIDS can be unpredictable! How do I know how much training/experience a strange kid has had with dogs? I DO know my dog has had very little experience with younger kids!
    And, yeah, Jonsi my boy is the size of one of those small horses and because a Shepherd is still considered a puppy at 18 months he's as clumsy as hell! He's 95 pounds and his daddy weighs 140!
    Your kids would love him!

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    1. This is one of those moments where there doesn't even need to be justification for why we're saying no: "No, your children can not pet my dog." And "No, I don't want your dog to approach me."

      As the pet owner, you are the most qualified to decide whether it's in your dog's best interest for a child to approach him. Your reasoning behind saying no is sound, but not necessary. "No" (because I don't feel like letting anyone pet my dog today) would work for me to. No means no and really doesn't need justification.

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    2. I actually love big dogs - I feel like they have more personality than the littler ones. Plus, you can hug them, they're like big teddy bears.

      I have a feeling we'd get along great with your baby - between our (learned) respect for dogs and your responsible pet-ownership, we'd have tons of fun. (Which is how it's supposed to be) - I actually felt bad for the Doberman yesterday. I think the reason he wasn't getting in the car when the man was calling him was because he was sensing the tension in the air and wanted to know what it was all about. His (female) owner was right, he really did smell shit. She was just wrong about where the smell was coming from.

      Irresponsible people shouldn't be allowed to have pets.

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  4. (Rant Ahead) I am absolutely done with "doggy owners" and their profound sense of Entitlement. I also am an equal opportunity dog and cat person; however, it would never occur to me to INFLICT my animal on anyone else, to drag the animal everywhere I go etc. I'm so over these obnoxious and noxious people I have taken up arms to defend myself from them and their "pet"/bogus "Service Dog"/child substitute. I don't care if it's one of those small ankle biting shake-n-piss dogs or a large dog it doesn't matter-a bite occurs in an INSTANT as does knocking small children and/or fully grown adults over to "greet" them. My and property is OFF LIMITS to ay animals that are not mine. I also take walks and live rurally where charging dogs or packs of dogs and noxious/obnoxious owners reside as well. I always carry two tools: A squirt bottle filled with vinegar and a ski pole I paid 50 cents for from a thrift shop. And I use them BOTH. Your dog charges me while I'm walking on the other side of the road from your property, the first time will be the last time-I'm a good shot with a weapon of any kind. The owner gets all bent out of shape from a squirt of vinegar to the face and poochies "daddy" or "mommy" starts any crap I tell them the next step I'll take is spear fishing with my ski pole. I've done both particularly to protect myself from pack behavior. I'm well aware the problem is not the animal-it's the owner and that's exactly whose needs are being met, not their animal's/child substitute. Small children's normal behavior often triggers aggressive or prey response to the kids high pitched voices, running, playing etc. even in dogs who are typically not aggressive or overly friendly. YES, your dog IS a threat: I don't have to wait until it bites/knocks over/jumps up/pisses/takes a dump in my home or whatever it chooses to do before I act. Leash Laws do not exclude your very "special" canine. They are in place because of idiot obnoxious "doggie owners" whose animal they swear is non-aggressive/under their control, "FeFe never bit anyone before!" blaming the victim for their dog's resulting behavior etc. Keep your dog home. When you take it out, put it on a leash or keep it on your property. This "Me and My Dawg(s) Go Everywhere Together" is BS and an indicator to me of an Entitled owner. Not my problem. You get your feelings hurt when I squirt it with vinegar, use the business end of a ski pole, refuse admittance to you and your mutt, too bad: Your feelings SHOULD be hurt-repeatedly if necessary to make my point-if that's what it takes to get you to comply with my home/my rules or Leash Laws. A few tickets and fines later, maybe you'll get it. End Rant. As far as I'm concerned you and DH acted very appropriately in protecting your children. The only steps I would suggest in addition is takimg the tools mentioned above along on your walks and get the license plate # and report them to the Animal Control person in your community first time, every time. These idiots should not be allowed to own a dog. Typically these are exactly the people who view their animal as an extension of them, an "accessory" or a child substitute. With pet ownership comes responsibility including abiding by Leash Laws. I've owned a number of different dogs and they are wonderful pets-but they are STILL dogs with specific needs that eclipse any other consideration-particularly YOUR "wants." Shame on you for inflicting your selfish, self-serving wants on your dog and your community. You're a shitty dog owner and a disgrace to the rest of us who take this responsibility to our pets and our community seriously. I have no reservations about calling your behavior exactly what it is: Bull Shit.
    TW

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    1. On point! Oh how I wish I could print out your "rant" and pass it out to these assholes next time we bump into them on the trail. (Wouldn't do any good, I'm sure they wouldn't take it, but oh, how I'd love to do it).

      And now that you mention it, I have a cousin who used to walk around her neighborhood a lot and started taking a sharp heavy wooden stick with her to ward off unfriendly dogs after she was almost attacked by one that wasn't on a leash. We will definitely start doing that. And I didn't know that a spray bottle of vinegar would work.

      Serious question: Is the vinegar to spray at the owners or the dog?

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    2. God bless TW. Your rant is A+++++

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    3. I've never had to use the vinegar on people but I wouldn't hesitate to use what ever tools I had if anyone was acting in a threatening manner towards me or mine. Vinegar stings the eyes, believe me! Just FYI, the squirt bottle I carry is from Family Dollar and it's smaller, light weight, fits comfortably in my hand, easily carried-I can hold it securely with my index finger on the trigger-and it shoots a strong steady stream forcefully for about 6 ft. before it looses it's "umph." You could also use an empty squirt bottle you already have. I always have apple cider vinegar hanging around for a variety of uses including a great shampooed hair final rinse. I know it's old fashioned but it really makes your hair shiny and takes out all product buildup-I use it about once a month. I keep a plastic pitcher under the bathroom sink, fill it with 2C vinegar, stick it on the edge of the tub and when I'm done shampooing and rinsing I add a qt. of water to the pitcher, close my eyes and pour it over my head. Then rinse again to get the remaining vinegar out. This was done to me from the time I was a little and I learned don't open your eyes until the vinegar is well rinsed out! There were always compliments to "parents" re: my shiny hair.
      Well, you could always print out what ever parts of the rant work for you and stick a couple copies on the trees lining the path-no doubt they'll get pulled down by the very people that are the worst pet owners but why not?! Also, use your phone to record the dog moving toward you and the sound of the owners saying whatever BS they say-and in my experience it's never, "Come. Sit. Stay" because Yk, their poochie is harmless etc. and they know damn well the dog won't respond to their commands.
      Judith, I never allow a dog that has charged me, is growling etc. to get behind me-ever. I've seen and been subject to more attacks from behind than any other position. I turn and face them and if they continue to close the distance between us I use the squirt bottle when they're about 6 ft. away-that's my comfort zone.
      I ended a long term friendship with a woman last year in part because of her behavior with her highly anxious (large) dog who she drug everywhere because she wouldn't deal with it's separation anxiety and resulting destroyed house. The dog had bitten a number of people (from behind) and the last victim (that I'm aware of) was her young adult GRANDSON. Who simply got up from his chair to leave. When she told me about this I was appalled at her minimizing, shuck-n-jive ( "Didn't break the skin!") etc. until she folded and said, "OK, it was a bite..." She still has the dog to my knowledge but has alienated a lot of family and friends as a result of her and her dog's behavior.
      TW

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  5. And by the way-if that dog was "under (their) control" they would have demonstrated this immediately by calling the dog back to them when they saw you and family. And they didn't even attempt to do so.
    That tells me, no, their dog isn't "under control."
    Sometime an asshole is just an asshole and sometimes an asshole goes supernovae-in that case I regard them as Entitled CBs (Crazy Bitches/Basturds) in need of a metaphorical vinegar squirt/pointed end of my ski pole. I have a certain look/body language that says, "Stop now-there is a fission reaction barely under control..proceed and I will go all Chernobyl/Fukishema on you." This response would leave Donald Trump speechless-just before it melted off his face.
    TW

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    1. My mom has that look. She definitely has that look. I'm still working on mine. :)

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  6. You have the right to put boundaries and maintain them wherever you want them. It's their job to respect your space. Not yours to contain their dog in what they feel is safe. In the world of humans an assault doesn't begin when you punch someone. It begins when you put the person in fear of being punched.

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  7. This is also a pet peeve of mine. We live in a "dog friendly" town and their are often dogs running all over. I am so tired of hearing "but he's friendly!" I don't give a shit. The dog is the same height as my kids face and, for a child, it can be like having a bear run up on them. People seem so entitled about the whole thing, and I can't tell you how many people have gotten offended and accused me of "not liking" their dog (really? who CARES if I don't like your damn dog? ) And for the record I love dogs, I'm just very, very allergic, as is my child. But even if I wasn't, I don't want someone else's dog in my kids face, jumping on me, or in my personal space.
    I know two people (ironically a mother and daughter) who were both bit (in separate events) in the face by "nice" dogs. What people fail to remember is that they are DOGS, not people. Animals have very different instincts and drives than people. What might be something simple like a child leaning in to kiss a dog, might be perceived by the dog as a threat. Just this last summer, we had a lady pissed off at us because we wouldn't let our children go and see a very large German Shepard. She was insulted that we didn't "prove" we believed he was nice by allowing our children to touch them. We told her several times he was a beautiful dog and seemed very nice, but we would not allow the children to pet him by themselves.
    I also get very annoyed when people feel they need to bring dogs into stores and ride them around in the cart. At our local Walmart, you will constantly find dogs in the food section which I find so gross and unsanitary.
    Anyway, I totally understand why you were upset. I would have been too.

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    1. Excellent points. I often think about how most dogs are face-level with my kids too. It's like, if that dog attacks me, it's going to get my legs or my knee. If it attacks my kid, it's going to get his face. I had thought writing about this would make me feel better, but I'm still pissed about it. I'm having a hard time letting go of my anger.

      I also very strongly dislike when people bring their dogs to town parks and the park at DD's school. These are not dog parks, they are parks for children. And my dog-allergic child should be able to play there safely. I also don't want to step in dog poop, thanks.

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    2. Jesse, lots of people don't like my German Shepherd because of prejudice against his breed. These are the same people whose kids come charging over to my fluffy ten pound mutt. Which one do you suppose is more likely to bite?
      Either way, I don't give a crap who likes or dislikes my dogs as I have no intention of inflicting them on anyone even visitors to my home. I crate the big guys (yeah, I have two) and leave the little one in my bedroom when invited guests stop by.
      As you've likely guessed, I'm a very experienced owner with well-trained dogs, but don't believe ANY dog is 100% "OK".
      BTW Why the hell would anyone drag their dog around a store?

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    3. MF, I actually LOVE German Shepards. They are great dogs. But I also respect their nature and know that strange children getting to close to ANY dog, let alone a very serious one. Plus, they are just bigger physically and stronger. If they bite my kids (much as a lab, or a golden, or a Pitt) the damage would be much worse than a smaller dog.
      In any event, I just always think it's wise to err on the side of caution. It's very often not the dog's fault, just dogs being dogs that cause problems. I just like to be respectful of the nature of the dog. It's just not worth the amount of damage that could be caused if the dogs bit.
      And I really do like dogs. For me, it's really hard when I get jumped on or people let their dogs sit right next to me. I will become very asthmatic from the dander. Yet, so many people get offended if I suggest they move the dog, I hardly ever say anything. My MIL used to let five dogs come over for every holiday (and they didn't go outside and weren't put in a bedroom, because the dogs would "feel left out"). She didn't want to put my BILs out and wanted "all of the family" to be included. But dogs make me have asthma attacks, swell my eyes shut and I am generally ill for a week when confined to a space with them. She felt the dogs feelings were more important than mine.
      I don't know why they drag them through the store. I suppose I get it, when it's hot and they are afraid of leaving them in the heat....but still, why not just leave them home?

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    4. J - Yes, my thoughts exactly about the kids' face being "dog bite" height. I think the same thing. The little girl who I know got bit, got bit right in the face. She's had numerous surgeries to fix it. The dog was her Uncle's family's. It was a good dog, had been around children a ton, and knew this little girl well. But one day, he was in a mood, and she moved "wrong" and the dog latched onto her face. Just last month, her mother was petting a dog who was "friendly" and "sweet" (not saying it wasn't, just that those were the words used to describe the dog). She was loving on the dog and close to it's face, and it snapped and bit her. People don't realize that a face in a dog's face, even that of a child, can seem like a threat/challenge to a dog.
      I wish it all didn't bother me so much, but it does me too. It's not about the dogs, or their aggressiveness, but about the people who show NO respect for someone else's boundaries. They think their dogs rights far out reach my rights to chose who/what enters my personal space. Would we allow another human to jump up on us? Or even our kids? What would people do if we allowed our children to run and jump on anyone, calling after them "oh, but they are FRIENDLY!"? Would it be OK for me to just expect someone to hold my cat? Or be close to a person holding a snake? I know dogs are sweet and cute, but I can't judge by looking at one which one is dangerous and which is not...or which one might be having a bad day?
      My son has people bringing dogs to his soccer games. They sit these big dogs, who growl and pace all game between all of these people. It's unnerving.

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    5. DS is allergic to dogs too - when he was two, a neighbor's dog jumped on him and licked his face and the whole side of his face swelled up immediately. It was pretty scary. And he KNOWS he is allergic to dogs, though he doesn't necessarily understand the scope of it. I don't think he understands what might happen if he touched one or was in a confined space with one, but he knows it's potentially serious, so he's leery of them.

      And the incident last week while were hiking left him terrified. A big lab of some kind that was not leashed ran up to him while his back was turned. When DS turned around, he didn't expect there to be a massive dog inches from his face. He screamed and tried to run away. LUCKILY the dog wasn't frightened or go into attack mode, but holy shit, if he did, DS could have been really badly hurt. Again, at face level. And the owner expressed absolutely no remorse at all. He said something insensitive in a "joking" way, like "Oh, hey is Batman crying?" or something to that effect. I wasn't really paying attention to him because I was too busy trying to calm DS down. Afterwards, he sobbed into my shirt for a while and just held on to me for dear life. I wanted to punch that dog's owner in the throat.

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    6. From now on, we're going to walk with big sticks and bottles of vinegar. The kids can carry spray bottles of it to and I'll tell them that if a dog comes near them, to spray it right in the face. And if the owners are insulted or get angry, too fucking bad.

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  8. oooo, be prepared-these are exactly the type of entitled owners who will be highly indignant! I don't engage them as I made my point through my actions and I just keep going-talk to my ass. "Hey YOU! I'm TALKIN' to YOU!" Could be, but I'm not listening.
    TW

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    1. I'll be expecting that response from them and we'll keep right on walking!

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  9. I have to admit I keep checking back because I was SURE the crazies would contact you during the holidays you know how that brings them out of the woodwork lol glad you had a crazy free christmas!

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  10. Anon,

    I don't always write about their attempts at contacting us right away. Sometimes I sit on it for a while and do some analysis/discussing with DH before posting.

    But, right now I will reveal that I did get hits in my stats on at least one occasion just before Christmas that came from the crazies. They still poke around in here. Maybe they think I don't know they're still reading, or maybe they figure I see them and they just don't care. But - I'm taking notes. ;)

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