Thursday, June 14, 2012

Sock Puppets

From a "new" old blog I just discovered, What Makes Narcissists Tick (I believe the owner of the blog has since passed away, but it is still up and open for public consumption, and it contains a ton of gems). An anonymous commentator left the following assertion on one of her posts:

Sometimes I think that the worst torture one could devise for these freaks [narcissists] would be to lock them in a room all alone for about three days. After about an hour, they would probably have their socks on their hands like puppets, just to have someone to lie to. 

If any of you have not yet seen that particular blog, I recommend that you check it out as soon as possible. I've been reading through the archives with my bottom jaw sitting on the top of my desk. It's utterly fantastic and worth about a million read-throughs.

13 comments:

  1. I LOVE this quote! And thanks for sending me off to What Makes Narcissists Tick- what a remarkable site! I"ve found her book online and plan to rotary reading it tomorrow.

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    1. You're welcome! I figured, in the unlikely event that most of my readership hadn't yet stumbled upon that awesome resource, I owed it to everyone to share it.

      And newbies may just luck out and find it sooner, rather than later.

      I'm interested in the book too. :o)

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  2. I've read that blog, but I overlooked that gem. That's funny as hell.

    When my dad goes out of town, my mother becomes unable to leave the house, even to get the mail. It hasn't always been that way, but she's become increasingly paranoid as she ages.

    The dangerous thing about her, though, is that the fact that she is alone does not end the fantasy world she lives in. She creates conversations with people that aren't there and presents them as fact to others. For instance, she'll tell my brother that I told her that I think he's not as smart as my son. But not only had I not said such a thing, but I hadn't spoken to her in months. But she'll swear to even me that the conversation happened, but might MIGHT relent and say she must've been thinking about another conversation, but still with me and maybe I just said things wrong to her and gave her that impression. It's all convoluted fuvked up nonsense.

    So, my mom doesn't even need the damn sock puppet. Plus, being alone makes her angry at my dad, which usually was very very bad for everyone else.

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    1. Hmm - I wonder, is paranoia a normal side-effect in aging narcs? That's an interesting thought, and it sounds like your mother is only going to get worse as time goes on. (yuck)

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    2. Good question Jonsi! My NF is totally paranoid, but then he's pretty much always read something negative into the most innocent remark.

      Even as a kid, "Nice day today, daddy." might bring forth a furious response like, "What the hell do you mean by that?!!!"

      Great atmosphere for a kid to grow up in!

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    3. Hmm. So that makes me wonder further, about whether they're just paranoid by nature, all the time...

      That actually makes a lot of sense to me.

      And maybe as most of them get older, the paranoia just gets worse, and they get less and less adept at hiding it.

      A pretty sound, theory, I think.

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    4. Even my father and ESis have noticed NM is more paranoid.

      Seriously, my Esis still lives with our parents and when she's out late she has to text NM when she gets home so NM knows she is home and doesn't worry and have trouble sleeping. Calling or going into her room to tell her startles NM too much, so Esis specifically has to text! What frustrates me is that Esis just goes along with it! I can understand telling somebody you live with you'll be back late as a courtesy, but that's just absurd. It didn't start until a few years ago.

      She is also convinced certain areas are "bad" areas, and almost all at "bad" late at night in her book. There is this community event downtown in the evening I sometimes go to, and when I was telling her about it once, she tried to make me, her adult daughter who doesn't even live her, promise not to go alone! The parking lot is right next to the courtyard/stage, so it's a short walk and people would hear or see if something was happening to me, and it's not like I don't know people there! And if for some reason parking was full and I had to park further away, I'd ask somebody I knew to walk me back to my car. I'm not stupid! I refused to make such a ridiculous promise, it's not even a "bad" area, although there are some not far from it.

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  3. I think the paranoia has to do with both the idea that everybody is looking at the narcissist since they are so über important and that they are terrified of being revealed as frauds.

    And they probably also figure that everyone is thinking as deviously as they are, which means they have righteous cause to be paranoid.

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    1. YES! All good points.

      And your last point reminds me of something. I'll have to do a post today about it. Is it alright if I quote you, Vicarious?

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  4. FYI, the blog's author released an e-book called (fittingly) What Makes Narcissists Tick. Not sure if it's still available nor how one goes about getting it. It's certainly worth a read if you can still get it...

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  5. I was thinking more along the lines of...paid for. I'm not sure if it's still available for purchase (and if it is, who gets the money). I know the author is no longer among us, but I think if she had children or other dependents, or a charity she was fond of, I'd feel good paying for the book and having the money go where it is needed...

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